The Antivirus Guy Blog

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SANS – Internet Storm Center – WMF FAQ

What a way to start the year. I hope you guys at Microsoft are working hard on a patch, things are way past ugly now.

SANS – Internet Storm Center – Cooperative Cyber Threat Monitor And Alert System.

Handler’s Diary January 1st 2006

WMF FAQ (NEW)

Published: 2006-01-01,
Last Updated: 2006-01-01 05:54:51 UTC by Tom Liston (Version: 2(click to highlight changes))
  • Why is this issue so important?
The WMF vulnerability uses images (WMF images) to execute arbitrary code. It will execute just by viewing the image. In most cases, you don’t have click anything. Even images stored on your system may cause the exploit to be triggered if it is indexed by some indexing software. Viewing a directory in Explorer with ‘Icon size’ images will cause the exploit to be triggered as well.
  • Is it better to use Firefox vs. Internet Explorer?
Internet Explorer will view the image and trigger the exploit without warning. New versions of Firefox will prompt you before opening the image. However, in most environments this offers little protection given that these are images and are thus considered ‘safe’.
  • What versions of Windows are affected?
All. Windows 2000, Windows XP, (SP1 and SP2), Windows 2003. All are affected to some extent. Mac OS-X, Unix or BSD is not affected.
  • What can I do to protect myself?
  1. Microsoft has not yet released a patch. An unofficial patch was made available by Ilfak Guilfanov. Our own Tom Liston reviewed the patch and we tested it. The reviewed and tested version is available here (MD5: 99b27206824d9f128af6aa1cc2ad05bc). THANKS to Ilfak Guilfanov for providing the patch!!
  2. You can unregister the related DLL.
  3. Virus checkers provide some protection.

To unregister the DLL:

  • Click Start, click Run, type “regsvr32 -u %windir%\system32\shimgvw.dll” (without the quotation marks), and then click OK.
  • A dialog box appears to confirm that the un-registration process has succeeded. Click OK to close the dialog box.

Our current “best practice” recommendation is to both unregister the DLL and to use the unofficial patch.

  • Will unregistering the DLL protect me?
It might help. But it is not foolproof. We want to be very clear on this: we have some very stong indications that simply unregistering the shimgvw.dll isn’t always successful. The .dll can be re-registered by malicious processes or other installations, and there may be issues where re-registering the .dll on a running system that has had an exploit to succeed. In addition it seems there might be issues in the gdi32.dll which cannot be unregistered easily.
  • Should I just delete the DLL?
It might not be a bad idea, but Windows File Protection will probably replace it. You’ll need to turn off Windows File Protection first. Also, once an official patch is available you’ll need to replace the DLL. (renaming, rather than deleting is probably better so it will still be handy).
  • Should I just block all .WMF images?
This may help, but it is not sufficient. WMF files are recognized by a special header and the extension is not needed. The files could arrive using any extension, or embeded in Word or other documents.
  • What is DEP (Data Execution Protection) and how does it help me?
With Windows XP SP2, Microsoft introduced DEP. It protects against a wide range of exploits, by preventing the execution of ‘data segements’. However, to work well, it requires hardware support. Some CPUs, like AMD’s 64 Bit CPUs, will provide full DEP protection and will prevent the exploit.
  • How good are Anti Virus products to prevent the exploit?
At this point, we are aware of versions of the exploit that will not be detected by antivirus engines. We hope they will catch up soon. But it will be a hard battle to catch all versions of the exploit. Up to date AV systems are necessary but likely not sufficient.
  • How could a malicious WMF file enter my system?
There are too many methods to mention them all. E-mail attachments, web sites, instant messaging are probably the most likely sources. Don’t forget P2P file sharing and other sources.
  • Is it sufficient to tell my users not to visit untrusted web sites?
No. It helps, but its likely not sufficient. We had at least one widely trusted web site (knoppix-std.org) which was compromissed. As part of the compromise, a frame was added to the site redirecting users to a corrupt WMF file. “Tursted” sites have been used like this in the past.
  • What is the actual problem with WMF images here?
WMF images are a bit different then most other images. Instead of just containing simple ‘this pixel has that color’ information, WMF images can call external procedures. One of these procedure calls can be used to execute the code.
  • Should I use something like “dropmyrights” to lower the impact of an exploit.
By all means yes. Also, do not run as an administrator level users for every day work. However, this will only limit the impact of the exploit, and not prevent it. Also: Web browsing is only one way to trigger the exploit. If the image is left behind on your system, and later viewed by an administrator, you may get ‘hit’.
  • Are my servers vulnerable?
Maybe… do you allow the uploading of images? email? Are these images indexed? Do you sometimes use a web browser on the server? In short: If someone can get a image to your server, and if the vulnerable DLL may look at it, your server may very well be vulnerable.
  • What can I do at my perimeter / firewall to protect my network?
Not much. A proxy server that strips all images from web sites? Probably wont go over well with your users. At least block .WMF images (see above about extensions…). If your proxy has some kind of virus checker, it may catch it. Same for mail servers. The less you allow your users to initiate outbound connections, the better. Close monitoring of user workstations may provide a hint if a work station is infected.
  • Can I use an IDS to detect the exploit?
Most IDS vendors are working on signatures. Contact your vendor for details. Bleedingsnort.org is providing some continuosly improving signatures for snort users.
  • If I get hit by the exploit, what can I do?
Not much :-(. It very much depends on the exact exploit you are hit with. Most of them will download additional components. It can be very hard, or even impossible, to find all the pieces. Microsoft offers free support for issues like that at 866-727-2389 (866 PC SAFETY).
  • Does Microsoft have information available ?
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/advisory/912840.mspx
But there is no patch at the time of this writing.
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January 1, 2006 - Posted by | Antivirus News, Security News

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